METHAMPHETAMINE AWARENESS

RISK FACTORS OF MAKING METHAMPHETAMINE

With Clan labs, the risk of explosions, fires, and direct contact with toxic fumes, poisonous gases, and hazardous chemicals always exist.

The mix of chemicals involved in making methamphetamine can produce hazardous vapors that are easily ignited.

Unlike many other synthetic-based illegal drugs, it does not take a chemist to produce meth. Meth laboratory operators or "cooks" usually are individuals who have little or no chemical training and simply learned a formula in prison or from the Internet. These small laboratory operations make importation and interdiction efforts irrelevant when, with easily obtained chemicals, an individual with the basic knowledge of how to cook meth can independently produce thousands of dollars worth of this dangerous drug.

Each pound of meth manufactured in a clan lab generates up to 5 or more pounds of toxic waste. Clan lab operators routinely dump such waste into local streams, rivers and sewage systems in order to cover up the evidence of their illegal operations. Moreover, chemical reactions that occur during the manufacturing of meth produce chemical vapor that can permeate walls, carpets, plaster, and even the wooden structures of buildings.

FOR ASSISTANCE… OR TO REPORT INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

STARK COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

STARK METROPOLITAN NARCOTICS UNIT (330) 430-3697

or

COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION (330) 430-3800

Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine is a stimulant drug that is chemically related to amphetamine but with stronger effects on the central nervous system. It is made in illegal laboratories and can be taken orally, snorted, injected, or smoked.

Methamphetamine stimulates the release of high levels of dopamine in the brain. Dopamine is a chemical associated with pleasure and reward and also essential for movement. Over time, methamphetamine appears to cause reduced levels of dopamine, which can lead to a chemical change, in how the brain works.

Methamphetamine may also be called: METH, ICE, CRYSTAL, SPEED, GLASS, YABA, SHARDS or CRANK.

Short-term Effects: Increased heart rate, blood pressure and breathing rate, increased talkative-ness, insomnia, reduced appetite, hallucinations, and confusion. Other effects of large doses include fever and sweating, dry mouth, headache, blurred vision, dizziness, irritability, tremors, anxiety, paranoia, hyperthermia, and convulsions. Hyperthermia and convulsions can result in death. After the effects wear off, the "crash" includes deep depression, followed by fatigue, headaches, and decreased energy.

Long-term Effects: These include violence and aggression, malnutrition, fatal kidney and lung disorders, liver damage, possible brain damage, and depression. Prolonged methamphetamine abuse can produce symptoms resembling schizophrenia. These include paranoia, hallucinations, repetitive behavior patterns and delusions of parasites or insects in the skin.

Addiction: Methamphetamine carries a high potential for abuse and dependence. Users can develop tolerance quickly, needing a greater amount to get high and going on longer binges. Cravings can become very intense, and users may go to great lengths to obtain more of the drug. Withdrawal symptoms include extreme irritability, loss of energy, depression, fearfulness, excessive drowsiness or difficulty sleeping, shaking, nausea, palpitations, sweating, hyperventilation, and increased appetite.

METHAMPHETAMINE LABS

One reason methamphetamine is such a threat in America is because it is cheap and easy to make. Drugs that can be bought over the counter at local stores are mixed with other common ingredients to make meth. Small labs to cook the drug can be set up on tables in kitchens, countertops, garages or just about anywhere.

PREVENTION:

BECOMING INFORMED

Parents:

Health Professionals:

Community Members: